Regarding male gaze in stories, a good encapsulation of it was this Cracked.com article: "Right now I'm reading a book from mega-selling fantasy author George R. R. Martin. The following is a passage where he is writing from the point of view of a woman -- always a tough thing for men to do. The girl is on her way to a key confrontation, and the narrator describes it thusly: When she went to the stables, she wore faded sandsilk pants and woven grass sandals. Her small breasts moved freely beneath a painted Dothraki vest ..." That's written from the woman's point of view. Yes, when a male writes a female, he assumes that she spends every moment thinking about the size of her breasts and what they are doing. Janet walked her boobs across the city square. 'I can see them staring at my boobs,' she thought, boobily." Basically, unless your narrator is a narcissist, they're unlikely to be erotically fascinated by their own body. Even if they're a hot woman. If they're a woman who likes men, they should be more interested in describing the bodies of the men they meet than their own body. If they like women, get them to describe other womens' bodies, not their own. I don't think this is something you're particularly guilty of, but it's always worth bearing in mind. A lot of the stories in Curvy Girls employed the device of starting the story with the narrator in front of the mirror or bathing or getting ready, inspecting themselves critically. I just find it really lazy writing, you know? It's a cheat way of achieving the same effect, and a lazy way of telling your reader what your narrator looks like. I much prefer to find that out through a slow reveal, shown through what happens, rather than through a physical description dump on the first page. I do think quite a lot about gaze in DoS films, but mostly in terms of making sure my male performers, especially male bottoms, get as much flattering camera time as the women. In my F/M scenes I'd rather crop the top's face out of shot than the bottom's, so I guess to some extent I'm trying to capture the female top's POV. I haven't played much yet with telling a story exclusively from one character's POV yet though. Although I am currently planning a spankee's-perspective spanking where the camera only gets to see what a bottom sees while over the knee. One thing that really bugs me is the use of "point of view" in the industry to refer to monologues by women addressed to the camera. It means the camera's POV, but it's often used to refer to the woman's POV, which is the opposite. A woman's POV doesn't see the woman at all, it sees what she's looking at.

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